So Long Margaret Thatcher, Thanks For the Great Music
  • MONDAY, APRIL 08, 2013

  • Posted by: Matt Howard

It appears that today's biggest news story is not of former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher's passing, but the Twitter hashtag confusion of "#nowthatchersdead", which led to the abundance of social media's lowest thinkers to surmise that Cher had died. This obviously led to the social media elitists' LOLs at the ignorant youth, which eventually led to my writing of this painful intro. But this idiotic confusion with Cher wasn't Margaret Thatcher's only tie to the music world. As Britain's longest-serving Prime Minister, she held office from 1979-1990, and managed to piss off A LOT of musically influential people.

Her conservative policies emphasized deregulation and privatization of state-run companies, which as we in the U.S. know, can tend to aggravate a pretty substantial portion of a population. Thatcher's tenure coincided with the growth of budding musical movements like punk, and her economic assault on the everyman spawned some of the most viciously awesome protest songs of modern time. But don't be mistaken, we're not saying she caused punk as the Sex Pistols released Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols in '77. But the distaste for the nation's leader became a fashionable catalyst of unification for musicians, artists and fans of the movement. Unlike the revolutionary tunes of the 60s that used folky rhythm and delicate lyricism to bash the war, 80s Thatcherism declarations were brazen and often brutal, but what do you expect when you piss off a bunch of Scotsmen?

So we decided to look back at some of the most monumental pop culture references of disapproval for the Iron Lady. Pretty metal name for a little old woman, wouldn't ya say?

Morrissey - Margaret on the Guillotine



Although today Morrissey is better known for his whiny assault on the Duck Dynasty dudes and meat eaters in general, the guy was once all about butchery, but only if it was ole' Mags heading to the slaughterhouse.


Crass - "How Does It Feel"



Although I was a decade behind the anarchist preaching of groups like Crass, my friends and I still managed to find ways to identify with their rebellious words, even if it was only about wanting a later curfew (we were pretty heavy).


Elvis Costello - "Tramp the Dirt Down"



Alison wasn't the only chick to piss off the thick-rimmed crooner. This tune came in 1989, towards the end of Maggie's tenure, and even back then, Elvis was ready to dance on her grave.


UB40 - "One In Ten"



UB40's "One In Ten" spoke to the unemployment rate of the UK in 1981, as well as just being seen as a statistical figure in the eyes of the government.


Tears For Fears - "Sowing The Seeds Of Love"



Sounds like something pretty genial right? Until you pay attention: "Politician Granny with your high ideals/Have you no idea how the majority feels?"


And in photos:








Love her or hate her, her tumultuous legacy inspired protest songs that have in some way or another impacted the music we hear and love today today. So thanks, I guess?





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