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Show Review

Yellow Ostrich operate in an oddball musical realm; one which is almost as unusual as their namesake. The Brooklyn-by-way-of-Wisconsin outfit is led by singer-guitarist Alex Schaaf; a seemingly normal, floppy haired Midwesterner determined to lead his band through various disjointed flights of guitar, bass, and overblown, percussive rhythms. Schaaf's melodious vocals take wing overhead, and somehow, someway, elements jigsaw together in exhilarating ways. Talk about strange...perhaps why the band's second album in as many years is dubbed Strange Land. As you indulge in our latest concert offering, expect a little freakishness at first, but something that's ultimately becomes familiar and invigorating. Songs like "Marathon Runner", "Elephant King", and "The Shakedown" grab on to their listeners, demanding they pull their heads out of the sand and get down with what's happening on stage. Though the band was probably on show 17 of 17 during our Launch Pad Party in Austin, their enthusiasm and vigor for their tunes is easy to see and hear. So step inside the bizarre world of Yellow Ostrich. We think you'll be happy you did.

Artist Bio

"At some point you wonder if maybe the grass is greener, and then you go somewhere else and you realize it's not that much greener so what do you hope for now?" so says Yellow Ostrich's singer-guitarist Alex Schaaf, summing up the themes of his band's powerful new album, strange land.

Schaaf knows what he's talking about he moved to New York from Wisconsin in 2010, got a bunch of acclaim for the Yellow Ostrich album the mistress, signed to Barsuk and toured the U.S. several times with his hot new band: multi-instrumentalist Jon Natchez and drummer Michael Tapper. Still, wherever you go, there you are, and that's what strange land is all about.

Strange land retains Schaaf's sweet, boyish voice and bracingly open-hearted songwriting, but adds a hard-won urban edge: brawny bass and busy, prominent drums, triumphal horns, and plenty of raw, overdriven guitar. As the album transitions from wistful but supercharged pop to new musical realms, it's as if you're hearing the transition the band itself made, from self-contained solo unit to a collaborative trio of outstanding musicians.

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Yellow Ostrich

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